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Media Coverage

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Media Coverage

Media Coverage Board

Media Coverage Board

The table including Thumbnail, Title, Date

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TINY ROBOT ARM MADE WITH ORIGAMI CAN HOLD THE WEIGHT OF THREE CATS TINY ROBOT ARM MADE WITH ORIGAMI CAN HOLD THE WEIGHT OF THREE CATS Designs inspired by the paper-folding tradition of origami have captured the imagination of inventors. But by definition, stuff that can fold has weak points. Researchers in Seoul, South Korea, think they’ve figured out a way around that issue. They published their work on a stiff, origami-inspired, foldable drone arm in Science Robotics on Wednesday. Mar 16, 2018
Origami-Inspired Foldable Robot Arm Developed for Drones Origami-Inspired Foldable Robot Arm Developed for Drones Inspired by the traditional Japanese folding technique origami, the arm can be equipped with a grab or a camera and allows access to tubes, chimneys or other narrow places. A team of scientists led by Kyu-Jin Cho from Seoul National University in Seoul (South Korea) presented the device in the journal “Science Robotics“. Mar 16, 2018
Seoul National University Humidity-Powered Hygrobots Could Be The Future Of Microbots Hygrobot is the name that has now been given to tiny robot-like entities that are capable of creeping, crawling, and slithering-like movements powered by moisture alone. The term, as well as the research on this was conducted by a group of researchers at the Seoul National University in South Korea, and is a shortened reference to hygroscopically powered robots. Mar 16, 2018
Meet Hygrobots, the robots that run on humidity Meet Hygrobots, the robots that run on humidity Researchers from the Seoul National University have invented robots that can ‘inchworm’ forward by absorbing humidity from their surroundings. Named ‘Hygrobots’, the robots can crawl, twist back and forth and also like a snake. Mar 16, 2018
Seoul National University Researchers Develop Tiny Robots That Are Powered By Moisture Tiny robots have a lot of use, such as being small enough where they can swim around in our bodies to fight illness, or for infiltration where they are too small to be detected. However the problem with small robots is how do you power them? While tiny batteries are one way to go about it, batteries themselves do pose a problem, such as potentially exploding. Mar 16, 2018
Seoul National University Plant-Inspired Robots Inch Forward by Absorbing and Releasing Water Researchers have created robots that wriggle forward when the humidity in the room changes or the bots are placed on a wet surface -- no batteries required. The centimeters-long “hygrobots” were inspired by plant structures such as wild wheat seeds that bury themselves by repeatedly opening in dry air and closing in wet air. Mar 16, 2018
Seoul National University This Inchworm Robot Doesn't Need Electricity or Motors to Move South Korean scientists have developed tiny robots that don't need an engine or battery to power their movements. But it's not perpetual motion. Instead, the robots run on environmental humidity, absorbing the moisture in their surroundings to be powered by water. Mar 16, 2018
Bye batteries? Tiny robots from South Korea run on humidity Bye batteries? Tiny robots from South Korea run on humidity The idea of smarter and faster robots replacing humans may seem like science fiction nightmare, but the concept has slowly made its existence and mark known in the field of medical technology — and it’s not leaving anytime soon. As much as it is easy to visualize in fear artificially intelligent humanoid robots that will eventually betray and destroy the human race, such worries are far-reaching and should be put to rest. Mar 16, 2018
Tiny hygrobots need no batteries—they are powered by water Tiny hygrobots need no batteries—they are powered by water A team of researchers at Seoul National University has developed a series of small robots that move without need for an engine or batteries. Instead, as the researchers explain in their paper published in the journal Science Robots, the hygrobots, as they are called, move due to absorption and evaporation of water. Mar 16, 2018
Micro-bots and nanoparticles Micro-bots and nanoparticles Ho-Young Kim and colleagues took inspiration from nature’s plants which move almost exclusively through hydraulics, or the movement of fluid from one region of tissue to another. Mar 16, 2018