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SNU Professors Find Natural Technique To Increase Egg Production

  • February 17, 2017
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 The buckwheat-fed chickens laid 8.2% more eggs than the control group. The weights of the egg white and shell of these eggs were heavier by 2.1% and 5.8% respectively, and the L-Carnitine and GABA (Gamma-Amino Butyric acid) contents in the eggs were also 13.6% and 8.4% greater.
The buckwheat-fed chickens laid 8.2% more eggs than the control group. The weights of the egg white and shell of these eggs were heavier by 2.1% and 5.8% respectively, and the L-Carnitine and GABA (Gamma-Amino Butyric acid) contents in the eggs were also 13.6% and 8.4% greater.

A research team led by Professors Doman Kim and Tae Sub Park of the Graduate School of International Agricultural Technology found that chicken feed including naturally fermented buckwheat increases the production of eggs by over 8%. The researchers used Rhizopus – a fungus causing the group of infections referred to as zygomycosis and usually found in decaying breads, fruits, and vegetables - to ferment the buckwheat. The team found that chickens eating the buckwheat feed laid more and larger eggs.

40 chickens were divided into two groups, with one group receiving feed that included 1.6% of the fermented buckwheat, and were examined over a period of a month. The buckwheat-fed chickens laid 8.2% more eggs than the control group. The weights of the egg white and shell of these eggs were heavier by 2.1% and 5.8% respectively, and the L-Carnitine and GABA (Gamma-Amino Butyric acid) contents in the eggs were also 13.6% and 8.4% greater.

L-Carnitine is a substance that decomposes fatty acid, and is effective in improving infertility, chronic fatigue, and weight loss. GABA has been shown to help relieve depression and strengthen immunity, and is largely found in kimchi and yoghurt.

The research team said, “this study opens the door to creating various types of high-quality food products without the use of chemical treatment.”

The research findings were published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture.

Written by Hye Bin Lee, SNU English Editor, hahahybes@snu.ac.kr
Reviewed by Professor Travis Smith, Department of Asian Languages and Civilizations, tlsmith@snu.ac.kr

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